Work Smarter, Not Harder.


Most of us have the same dream work environment: rolling out of bed, grabbing a cup of coffee, and settling into the couch to start the work day. But is this actually the dream?


Claire Cellier and Deirdre Anderson studied the effects of working remotely using interview data from three organizations. They separated respondents by gender, parental status, and level of flexibility in their work. The research they performed demonstrated that those of whom are lucky enough to work from the comfort of their house, whether it be everyday or just part time, have higher levels of job satisfaction and organizational commitment than those who work exclusively in the office. Moreover, people who work remotely experience “work intensification” — which means that they voluntarily work harder. Flexible workers have shown increased enthusiasm about their work and also produce better work.


But why? Research demonstrates that people enjoy working at home so much that they to reciprocate by working harder, both in time spent and in work accomplished. Working remotely also allows employees to work harder, more easily — which embodies the phrase “work smarter, not harder.” This is due to the lack of workplace distractions. It could also be that some people work better at 2:30 am and can jam through eight hours of work before lunch. Flexible workers have shown increased enthusiasm about their work and also produce better work.


So what what does this mean for us? Everyone benefits from working at home in our pajamas. The organization gets enthusiastic and hard working employees and employees are happier.


Source: “Doing more with less? Flexible working practices and the intensification of work”


Thanks for reading!

Allison



© 2019 by Abnormal Group LLC. 

  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Twitter Icon
  • White LinkedIn Icon
  • White Instagram Icon
Abnormal Logo-white.png